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Posted 7/26/2013 6:39pm by David Paulk.

This time of year can be very hetic but we're holding it all together.  The garlic, onions and most all of the pototes have been harvested which is a big relief.  We've also completed the last of the big plantings; tomatoes, peppers, watermelon, cukes and squash.  Our focus now is keeping up with the harvest of tomatoes, peppers, AND keeping the weeds in-check.  Before you know it, soon we'll be planting Fall seasoned crops and harvesting sweet potatoes, kale and winter squash.  

Photo:  A new bee hive thanks to Farmhand Joe. 

Posted 6/16/2013 7:05pm by David Paulk.

This week we took delivery of our new "high-tunnel" also called a "hoop-house". This structure is similar to a greenhouse except it is not heated, or I should say, it's heated only by the sun's solar energy.  Unlike a greenhouse, the high-tunnel is built on top of the ground and provides a sheltered home for plants growing directly in the soil.  Greenhouses often have concrete or gravel floors and are mostly used to grow transplants in seed trays in a controlled environment that will later be planted out in the field. 

Our new high-tunnel will allow us to grow more crops later into the fall and earlier in the spring because the structure helps to keep the soil warm and protect the plants from frost.  We're super-excited about the possibilities and look forward to experimenting with it this fall - once we figure out how to put it together =:-)

Some assembly required...

Posted 6/13/2013 6:42pm by David Paulk.

What a week it's been!  Between rainstorms and nearly 5" of rain (for the week), we managed to get some lettuce transplants in the ground (while wearing hip waders), weed the seemingly endless rows of onions, trellis tomatoes, prune a thousand strawberry plants, seed over 40 acres of summer cover, trim 45 ac of field edges, take delivery of our new "high-tunnel" (unheated greenhouse), and become selected as the first farm in St Mary's County and first organic vegetable farm in the state to be FSCAP (Farm Stewardship Certification and Assessment Program) certified!  Not bad for couple of greenhorns...  And many thanks to our hardworking crew who keeps us on our toes!  

Posted 6/1/2013 8:33pm by David Paulk.

Technology is a wonderful thing for a small farmer.  Jen and I both find our smart phones invaluable.  As farmers, we use our phone to send e-mails to customers, chefs, photograph crops in fields, monitor weather, text our workers, place calls to suppliers, chefs and each other, manage my calendar, and stay in touch with the world.  I could not live without mine, it really helps me run the business "on the go."  I suppose that's why they call them "smart phones."  

Unfortunately, mine wasn't as smart as I'd hoped.  Yesterday, I ran over it with the tractor and it didn't have enough sense to move!

Not so Smart Phone (Run over by tractor)

Not as dumb as I thought (still works)

Posted 5/26/2013 5:47am by David Paulk.

The Staff recently explained to me that we should have a Facebook page.  I learned a long time ago to take the advise of smarter people then me.  Presenting:  Sassafras Creek Farm Facebook

Posted 5/20/2013 9:35pm by David Paulk.

Potatoes grow really well in our climate and this year's crop looks excellent.  Today, I noticed the first potato flowers of the season - beautiful.   I also noticed our first potato insect, The Colorado Potato Beetle - the Beast! Right now there are (were) only a few CPB's on the plants.  We'll keep scouting the plants for any more invaders and dispatch them before they ruin the crop.  

Posted 5/13/2013 9:28pm by David Paulk.

An exprience farmer told me the other day, that year's ago, spring time was often cold and wet.  He said, get used to it; develop strategies to work around it. Another seasoned farmer said, "never complain about the weather."  So, following thier advise, we've just keep our heads down and planted crops according to our schedule put together this past Decemeber.  Sometimes, it's worked, other times not so much.  We planted Sugar Snap peas four times this year.  It was just too cold for them to germinate.  Now they are doing just fine.  I'm on my third try at bush beans - same problem as the peas; right time, wrong year.  It's okay in my book.  I like a challenge and learning from my mistakes.  So this weekend, we took the plunge risking the cool weather and transplanted our first batch of tomatoes, many hundreds of them.  They were very much ready.  I think they will be just fine. And if not, we'll try again :-)  Photo: Farmhand Joe, tying up Big Beef tomatoes.  

Posted 5/3/2013 3:48pm by David Paulk.

Spring has come and the vegetables tell me this everyday.  All except for one crop that we expected by now, strawberries.  By next week, these little jewells will be ready for picking.  I can't wait!  

Behold, the super sweet Earliglo strawberry.

Posted 4/18/2013 7:37pm by David Paulk.

Spring is marked by many events, for Jennifer, the coming of our delicious strawberries is a sure highlight.  I took this photo today. The plants look excellent.  By my observations, we should have strawberries by the first weekend in May.  Deelish!

Posted 4/6/2013 6:10pm by David Paulk.

New recipe: Tropical Carrot, Ginger, And Turmeric SmoothieOctober 13th, 2017

Ingredients: 1 blood or navel orange, peel and white pith removed 1 large carrot, scrubbed, coarsely chopped ½ cup frozen mango chunks ⅔ cup coconut water 1 tablespoon shelled ra

New recipe: Whole Roasted Carrots with Fresh GingerOctober 13th, 2017

1 pound medium carrots, peeled 1/4 cup water 4 large garlic cloves, peeled Six 1/4-inch slices fresh ginger 1 tablespoon canola oil 1 tablespoon unsalted butter Salt and freshly ground pepper Olives,

New recipe: Kale & Sweet Potato HashOctober 13th, 2017

1 large sweet potato, chopped 1 yellow onion, sliced 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 bunch kale, chopped 2 tsp. cumin seeds salt & pepper 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice 1 Tbs. fresh cilantro leaves ~1/4 cup c

 

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